Issue 06

Recipes

Breakfast

Recipe by The Communal TablePhotography by Cheryl Juetten
Directions

Preheat oven to 350°F.

Prepare a pan by placing a dozen of these panettone paper liners on a sheet pan. These small baking cups are unique in that you don’t need a molded pan for them, yet they are lovely and stand on their own. Alternatively, you could use muffin tins. Simply line two dozen regular muffin tins with paper liners or oil thoroughly.

Sift together the flour, baking powder, baking soda, salt, cinnamon, cloves, and nutmeg.

In a separate large bowl, beat the eggs until combined. Add the sugar and beat until the mixture starts to become pale and foamy. Drizzle in the olive oil and beat until emulsified and no longer freely visible in the mixture. Add the molasses, vanilla, ginger, and pumpkin puree, and mix until combined. Make a well in the dry ingredients and stir in the liquid mixture until no dry flour is visible. Be careful not to overmix. Add the chocolate chips and toasted pistachios or pumpkin seeds, if using and fold a few times, just until combined.

Spoon by the heaping ¼ cup (#12 scoop) into prepared panettone molds until they’re about ¾ full. Sprinkle a few pistachios or pumpkin seeds on top for garnish. Bake for 30-35 minutes until the tops are set and a toothpick comes out clean. Let cool on a rack for at least 10 minutes, but for best results, let them cool longer so they don’t stick to the paper—about an hour should do it. Eat them warm with a dollop of softly whipped crème fraiche or store in an airtight container at room temperature for about a week. These also freeze well. Savor with delight and gratitude.

 

*At Communal Table, we strive use fresh flour. What does this mean? Well, flour comes from grain and grain comes from a plant (usually a grass, to be exact…) A few years back we realized that we’d been sourcing the best local vegetables, meat, and dairy…and at the same time, we completely took our flour for granted. It always came in an innocuous, white, all purpose variety whose sources were completely veiled. Thanks to some innovative farmers, millers, and bakers in our area, we have learned to change that. Now we see flour the same way as we see any fresh food, and we prefer to source it from people that pay attention to sustainability and flavor, rather than shelf-stability. Using this kind of flour can be a bit trickier, but we think it’s worth it. On the upside, these flours retain more nutrients and have far more complex flavor.

For this recipe, we tested Anson Mills graham flour, Camas Country Mills Edison white, and Hayden Mills White Sonora. They all tested slightly different, because as we said, real flour has inherent flavor of its own, but all were gobbled up. We especially loved the White Sonora for these.

leela

these look SOOOO good! i can’t wait to try the recipe.

 

Please fill out the fields, below. Comments may be moderated. Required fields are marked *.

Valid Name Required
Valid Email Required
Reply Required
Jennifer

These are amazing. Decadent breakfast or perfect dessert.

 

Please fill out the fields, below. Comments may be moderated. Required fields are marked *.

Valid Name Required
Valid Email Required
Reply Required
 

Please fill out the fields, below. Comments may be moderated. Required fields are marked *.

Valid Name Required
Valid Email Required
Comment Required